Assets Recovery Agency supports creation of Film Piracy Unit

The recent joint initiative by FACT with the Metropolitan Police to create the Film Piracy Unit has been endorsed by Alan McQuillan, Deputy Director of the Assets Recovery Agency (ARA). Alan has commented:

” Film Piracy sometimes tends to have a low profile in the UK, but this illegal activity is a huge business. It is also increasingly being targeted by organised criminals who recognize the potential profits and who operate internationally.

In some areas a lot of good work is going on at local level tackling the distribution channels but given the international dimensions and the links to organised crime, it is essential that the industry and law enforcement also tackle key players at a strategic level.

The Met Police / FACT Film Piracy Unit is a therefore an important innovation. By focusing on developing intelligence in relation to this type of crime across the UK and in the international context, the Unit can help expose the extent of the problem, raise the profile of this activity and help ARA and law enforcement agencies maximise their impact in attacking those involved. “

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