Trading Standards swoops on counterfeit criminals

Counterfeiters assets taken by Powys County Council

Hertfordshire Trading Standards, supported by FACT, has carried out further raids as a result of the major operation against counterfeiting at Bovingdon Market in April this year.

On Wednesday 25 July, raids took place at three addresses in Luton and Dunstable which were linked to the sale of counterfeit goods at Bovingdon Market. As well as a large quantity of counterfeit CDs and DVDs, handbags, sunglasses and cosmetics all appearing to be from well-known brands were also found.

Kieron Sharp, FACT Director General, said: “FACT continues to support the work of Hertfordshire Trading Standards in tackling the major problem of counterfeit and stolen goods being sold at markets and car boot fairs. Criminals operating at markets are not only harming those wishing to trade legally but are also threatening the jobs of many others whose skills create the films and TV programmes we all love.

“FACT supports the Real Deal kitemark that allows consumers to know that a market is free from stolen and counterfeit goods so they can shop safely.”

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